Methodist Messenger: April, 2014

Methodist Messenger: April, 2014 – Grangeville/Nezperce/White Bird UMC
(Note: “Getting Acquainted” is about Shirley Smith this month.)

From the Pastor:
Thinking about Lent, I was reminded of times when family and friends have died and I went through a period of grief. That experience although difficult, was a growing time for me. It made me look at myself and what was important in my life and how I view death. I was reminded of how healing it was to share stories about my family and friends with others, and of the connectedness of us all. It was like Sabbath time, allowing me to share my pain, sorrow, and sadness.
As we prepare for Easter, it seem to me that we often leave out the time of sorrow and pain and move right to the resurrection, and with that we miss out on a time to look at our lives and take stock of where we are and where we want to be. We don’t claim the pain and sorrow and sadness of our lives, but only look at the good parts. Yet, as we grieve the death of Jesus it forces us to realize that the world will be different after his death. Do we really see the changes and how do they change our lives?
We are all grieving over something at any given moment. May we be open to the hand of God as we travel down the road of grief, and may our lives grow through it.
Thanks be to God who gives us strength!
Peace to you all! Barbara

MEMORIAL FLOWER TUBS: The cost $45.00 and we have only 8 tubs. Get in touch with Shirley Smith, 983-6102, and tell us who you wish to dedicate your flower tub in memory OR in honor of. Write your check for $45.00 to Green Acres and we will deliver the checks to them. These need to be reserved by May 1. Our tubs have been planted and will be ready by Memorial Day weekend.

Sunday School for all ages: We are walking the road to Easter. We started with the children coming to Jesus, then progressed to the blind man being healed. Zachaeus teaches us that we are all worthy of a relationship with God. We studied communion as a sacrament and reviewed the dialogue of Jesus and the disciples. This teaches us that God may know us better than we know ourselves. Sue Crea and Sharon Cox
Adult Sunday school: We are led by Jerry Zumalt using “Change the World” by Mike Slaughter, with scripture and thought-provoking questions. We share if we want our thoughts and ideas. Come join us anytime between 10 and 10:45 am. All are welcome!

Cluster churches’ Lenten Service at Lewiston First UMC, will be on Sunday, April 13, 4 pm, all are invited. Save the date now and let Pastor Barb know if you will be going. They would like an idea as to how many are coming! Our church choir is practicing a Special for that day too!

Graduates: If anyone knows of any graduates, please let Rose Mangini know their names. We want to honor them at a coffee hour in May. Thanks.

Camas Prairie Food Bank: We really need any type of boxed or canned meal helpers. We also need some shampoo/conditioners or combinations. We do not give those out except for emergencies. We keep samples that are donated out for clients to pick from but need a few bigger bottles for families in trouble. You all are such wonderful help. Thanks, and have a great day. Carlene, Camas Prairie Food Bank, Inc., P.O. Box 686, Grangeville, Id. 83530, Location: 411 E. North St., 983-5475. Website is: http://www.camasprairiefoodbank.org/

Church History: I am interested in learning about the history of the different generations, and their stories, about their experiences and the different things that made their lives interesting as they were growing up in church. I am also interested in sitting down and interview those individuals who would like to share with me of when they joined the church if they were not raised in it. Please phone me at 208 983-0089. Everyone has a story to tell, and everyone has a history! By Dave Hammond, Historian

Choir practice: Our choir practice continues to practice special music each Monday, at 7 pm (except cancelled on March 3). We will be sharing special music during Lent. Please come and enjoy fun fellowship and praising our Lord with song!

UMCOM: We thank you for the recent donations! We continue to be able to assist families/individuals through the Human Needs Council. We are getting low on silverware at this time. Cookware is always needed as well as towels of all sizes and linens. We ask that donations be clean and in good working order.

United Methodist Women: Our next meeting will be on Wednesday, May 14, 10:00 am, at the church with no host lunch following. Please mark your calendars now and help us plan our year of mission work for our community, and around the world. All are invited to join us. On Sunday, March 2, Pastor Barb will install the officers for the local unit who are: Rose Mangini, President; Judy Purdy, Vice President; Shirley Lane, Secretary; and Marietta Hanson, Treasurer. Thanks ladies for your faithful service to UMW!! We are blessed to be a blessing.
UMW is helping us go green: We are wanting to use paper cups instead of Styrofoam OR use the coffee cups on the hooks for your coffee/drinks please! If you have a coffee cup, please put your name on it some place. The ones with no name will be discarded or placed for visitors to use. Thanks!
The Sharing Circle. Our next gathering is on Wednesday, April 2 & 16, at 10 am, at Crèma Café, 111 North College, Grangeville. All are welcome! Please come and enjoy the fellowship as we increase our faith in sharing of our journeys. We usually meet on the 1st and 3rd Wednesday of each month. We are using the Upper Room’s devotion for that day and discussing the questions in the back of that book.
Getting Acquainted: “Saturday’s Child must work for a living.” I don’t remember the rest of the verse but I believe it. I was born on Saturday, Nov. 6, 1937. I was named after a movie star the closest date to her opening, so to win the money, my Mom named me Jean Ardel after a movie star name Jean Harlow. Anyway, that is what she told me. The prize paid the doctor and once she had the money, she changed my name to Shirley Ann. You guessed it, after Shirley Temple. She said she had also threatened to give me away if I was another girl. Somehow she changed her mind.
I was born in Seattle, WA. And although I don’t remember the places we lived after that, I was told we lived in Seattle, the Moorlands near Kirkland, Bothell, and later Woodinville. I remember that place. It was like Old McDonalds farm. You name it, I think they raised it there on this ten acre farm at one time or another. I remember when I was in grade school, they got 200 baby chicks a week and sold 200 fryers a week. Mom also thought she would like some geese so she could make down pillows. What nasty birds. We had to take a broom with us to run up the hill to the outhouse to keep them from nipping us. We had no indoor plumbing for some time.
On this farm we had a horse, named Rocky, not a very nice one at that. He would love to try and brush you off under the fruit trees or run away with you. One time while mother was washing clothes, she let me ride him bareback around the house. I fell off and he stepped on my foot. The harder I pushed, the more he leaned on my foot. I yelled for Mom but she did not hear me so I bite him on the top of his leg, that was all the higher I could reach. He moved and the top of my foot turned a deep shade of black.
My Dad’s name was Albert and my Mom, Lovida, Anderson. They had lived through the depression and migrated to Washington from North Dakota during the dust bowl days, a time Mom lived through but never cared to talk much about.
I was the youngest in the family of four children. My dad would say he had two daughters, a boy, and a tom boy meaning me.
I am blessed that my siblings are still living. All in the Puget sound area.
Dad had an electric barbed wire fence around the place and we kids had to crawl under it to walk up the lane to catch the school bus. Mom braided my long hair so tight I swear it made me have slanted eyes. Anyway, one time coming home they got caught on the electric fence and my oldest sister wanted to save me but was afraid of getting shocked. She decided to run up to the chicken house and turn off the fence. Meanwhile, she said she was shocked at what was coming out of my mouth.
Mom was an active member of the PTA and one year they decided to put on a vaudeville show to earn money. They performed in various neighborhoods. I sang two solo’s in that show and had stage fright every time, but I minded my mother and did it. My mom was a very talented woman.
By the time I was in the 7th grade, my older sisters were both married and dad bought a dairy farm outside of Monroe. It lay between the Skykomish River and the Haskel slough. It was about a mile out of town. There was a railroad trestle that ran the length of the farm and to get to the school bus stop my brother and I had to climb a ladder to get up on it and cross over the slough to get to our bus stop. There were trains running on it in those years so at times we had to get across fast to beat them. The first year we lived there, they had a 100 year flood and I couldn’t get home. Neighbors I didn’t know picked me and the other kids that lived up the road up in a boat and we spent that night with them. My brother walked home on the trestle from town.
The slough was deep enough to swim in and as soon as it warmed up the town kids and I would swim there. Later in the year after picking berries, we swam in the Skykomish River. I picked berries to earn money for school clothes and the fair in the fall.
By the time I was a freshmen in high school, slough swimming ended because the trestle caught on fire and the debris clogged the pond.
I turned out for all the sports I could while in high school, borrowed a trumpet from my brother in law and joined the high school band.
I was also lucky enough to get a part time job after school and on Saturday at the Monroe Cleaners. I also substituted as an usher at the little town theater.
When I was a sophomore one of my best friends had her brother take us to the roller rink in Everett on the nights he went to Navy reserves. I later married him. We were engaged when I was a junior and we married December 15, 1956, the year I graduated from Monroe high school. We were married in the Monroe Methodist church by Rev. Tibbits with his wife Marla, my Mom and Dad and his parents in attendance. Buzz said if I was having a big wedding, he wasn’t coming. The summer before we married, I worked for a dentist while his regular gal was in the TB sanitarium.
Buzz, my husband, had bought a fixer upper house before we married. We moved into it before it was finished.
Buzz worked in the woods, and I got a job in Everett working as a substitute for Child Guidance Center. It lasted two weeks and that was long enough for me.
Dad offered to send me to Everett Business College. The first time I used an electric typewriter I about jumped out of my chair. I did get good on it but the ten key and I did not get along very good. I did get a job at our local Sea First Bank in the bookkeeping department on old bookkeeping machines. Lots of nights I spent looking for a penny I was off. Ugh.
We got pregnant that year and this ended my working out of the home while we were raising our family. Our son, Bart was born in 1960, Bret in 1961, and Brenda in 1963.
Buzz and my brother in law built a duplex in Monroe and sold it. With this money he purchased ten aches and a partially built house from his parents. He finished this and we moved out of town to the country. I was worried about raising my daughter with nothing but boys, (his brother lived on ten acres that joined our ten acres and had three boys), so we applied for a 4 year old foster daughter and received a 14 year old. I wrote about this in Buzz’s story so will not repeat here. Later, we got her 14 year old brother. She is 59 now and he is 50 and they have given us four wonderful grandsons.
We also have two more grandsons, and three granddaughters; and two great granddaughters with another great grandchild on the way.
When our kids were all in school, I saw a blind ad in our local newspaper for part time office help. I answered the ad and got the job. God really has a good sense of humor because this job was for our Monroe Newspaper. I cannot spell and said so, but was hired anyway. The Editor said he had editors and proof readers and wanted someone that could get to the point.
At first I only worked in the front office answering, phones taking ads, and money etc. Later as in all small offices, I did more writing and some selling.
I worked there for 17 years, three days a week. I stopped when we moved to Wyoming but when we moved back they asked me to come back.
We moved to Wyoming when our last child graduated. This too I wrote about in his story so will not repeat, only to say, I wrote a book about this adventure. I was not going to but my sister and Mom kept after me until I did. They had saved my letters so to get them off my back, I did and sent it to Publish American publishing company. They sent me a contract and the rest is history.
I quite when the paper was sold to a new publisher. He wanted me to work all week but I was taking care of my granddaughter by then so had to decline.
Later, I worked part time at Cascade Office Supply and continued working there until he sold, and then worked until I retired at 62 from Hitching Post Supply.
When Buzz finally retired in 2007, we sold our Monroe home and moved to Grangeville, and have lived here ever since. He had hunted here for years and really liked it here. My Mom came with us and liked it too. She died here when she was almost 100.
Following my husband has lead me on some interesting experiences. He loved to take his horses and mules packing in the mountains. One year in particular I will never forget. We were still living in town but had left our kids with his sister and set out with his younger sister and husband, his older brother and wife and another friend to ride the Crest trail from Stevens Pass to Lake Valhalla. My horse was in the lead when we came to a packer with a string of animals with no place to pass. He said he could back his string up to a wider spot and to wait, only my horse decide to try and turn around and slide out of site with me on him. I managed to get off him before he rolled on down the mountain. Buzz almost jumped on me as I was climbing back up. The horse rolled over but came out with only a cut on his back. We were all in shock, but finished the trip.
As to my Christian experiences, my mom saw to it, that we went to Sunday school at the Woodinville Community church when we were young. I was baptized in Woodworth, North Dakota as a baby when our family went back to see our grandparents. When I moved to Monroe, I attended the Monroe Methodist Church and went to Kings Teens. One of this group’s high lights was to attend the Billy Graham Crusade in Seattle.
I helped with the after school Good News program when my children were in school and taught Sunday and bible school while they were growing up.
I was called back into service when my granddaughter was little. I even learned a few cords on the guitar to help with the Sunday school music but have since given the guitar to a grandson.
I transferred my membership to Grangeville United Methodist church May 5, 1909, and have been attending here ever since.
I have been healed of breast cancer and ovarian cancer and have had a hip replaced. God is good. Submitted by Shirley Smith.

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